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Runners in South Brooklyn Are Great Neighbors!The New York City Marathon typically does not run through Red Hook, which has become isolated by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and very limited mass transit options (i.e. a single bus line).  But after Mayor Bloomberg canceled the Marathon on Friday, a group of local runners from the South Brooklyn Running Club organized a 10K, the Run for Red Hook, to raise funds for the Red Hook Initiative, the youth center that has been helping feed and clean residents of Red Hook all week after the neighborhood was flooded by Hurricane Sandy.During the Run for Red Hook on Sunday, November 4th, hundreds of Brooklynites ran down to the waterfront. They jogged past food lines on West 9th and cheering public housing residents, who have spent days with neither electricity nor heat.  The run ended at 61 Local, a bar in nearby Cobble Hill named after Red Hook’s one and only bus route, B61.  By noon, the athletes were refueling on donated beer and baked goods, while the organizers basked in an adrenaline glow intensified by nearly $7,000 raised and a truckload full of donations — not bad for fewer than two days of planning.Thank you to everyone who made this fundraiser a huge success!  This is community.Question:  Do you have any comments for the South Brooklyn Running Club and the generous runners in Brooklyn?

Runners in South Brooklyn Are Great Neighbors!

The New York City Marathon typically does not run through Red Hook, which has become isolated by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and very limited mass transit options (i.e. a single bus line).  But after Mayor Bloomberg canceled the Marathon on Friday, a group of local runners from the South Brooklyn Running Club organized a 10K, the Run for Red Hook, to raise funds for the Red Hook Initiative, the youth center that has been helping feed and clean residents of Red Hook all week after the neighborhood was flooded by Hurricane Sandy.

During the Run for Red Hook on Sunday, November 4th, hundreds of Brooklynites ran down to the waterfront. They jogged past food lines on West 9th and cheering public housing residents, who have spent days with neither electricity nor heat.  The run ended at 61 Local, a bar in nearby Cobble Hill named after Red Hook’s one and only bus route, B61.  By noon, the athletes were refueling on donated beer and baked goods, while the organizers basked in an adrenaline glow intensified by nearly $7,000 raised and a truckload full of donations — not bad for fewer than two days of planning.

Thank you to everyone who made this fundraiser a huge success!  This is community.

Question:  Do you have any comments for the South Brooklyn Running Club and the generous runners in Brooklyn?